James Lee Loomis House

245 Salmon Brook Street

A Bit More:

Yes, there are lots of Loomis families. Harrison was the father of James Newton, Chester Peck, and George Lee Loomis.  In 1876 Chester Peck and Eliza Harger Loomis were owners. In 1921 the house was owned by James Lee Loomis, son of Chester Peck and was enlarged to its present size.

The Rev. Malicote, minister of South Congregational Church, bought the house in 1971, and Brenda and Martin Huey bought it in 1977.

This House:

This imposing house was probably built in the summer of 1861 for Harrison and Charlotte Peck Loomis. It was eventually owned by three generations of the Loomis family, in a direct line.

Chester Peck Loomis,
father of James Lee Loomis

Laura Loomis, Chester Peck Loomis, James Lee Loomis, Chester’s Wife Estelle

Even More:

James Lee Loomis died in 1971 at age 92. He lived in Granby his whole life and, as a young man, worked in the Loomis Bros. store. He paid his way through Yale Law School by renting two apartment houses and subletting the rooms. He retired as chairman of the board of Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance, president of the board of trustees of the Loomis Institute (Loomis and Chaffee schools), director of The Courant, a trustee of the Simsbury Bank and Trust Co. and on and on. When he retired Morgan Brainard, then president of Aetna Life said: “Jim Loomis represents the type of executive with ideals which are held with highest esteem… Carving out his own career, he got to the top without affection. Simplicity, directness, and character have been his keynotes.”

The original fireplace in the room behind what was the carriage house. Inscription on the big beam “The Future is an Adventure in Faith”

This is the original stained glass window that is on the stairway leading up to the third floor. The L stands for the Loomis family who built the house.

Dark fireplace is the original in the dining room. It is slate painted to look like marble.

208 Salmon Brook St
Granby, Hartford County 06035
USA

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